Dog Days

It’s been quite a summer, so forgive the radio silence. In addition to moving to the San Francisco Bay Area (where housing costs as much as a moderate heroin addiction), I have also been talking to a lot of writers, working to pay the aforementioned rent, and reading through the incredible books that are nominees for The Kirkus Prize (for which I am one of the aforementioned judges for nonfiction). Add to all that writing reviews and features and trying to cross the El Camino Real without getting squashed like a bug, and it’s been a little busy. Now, where were we?

Less Than HeroJust before the move started to get serious, I finally got around to interviewing S.G. Browne, another San Francisco denizen who has been cracking me up since his first book, Breathers.

(“Was that the one about the dead kid who falls in love with a live girl? I love that movie.)

(No, Twilight, you’re thinking of the movie Warm Bodies, which was based on Isaac Marion’s book of the same name, and which is not nearly as funny as Breathers.)

Anyway, enjoy this interview at Kirkus Reviews with Scott about his new novel Less Than Hero, in which we talk about drugs, superheroes, Chuck Palahniuk, and the meaning of life.

The CartelJust as I was packing up to leave Colorado, Kirkus published my second interview with the inspiring Don Winslow. I’m a fan of Don’s lighter work, notably the surf novels The Dawn Patrol and The Gentleman’s Hour but you have to admire his ambition in writing The Cartel, a massive magnum opus of a crime novel that follows up from his 2005 novel The Power of the Dog and connects four decades of drug-running, unimaginable violence and unnecessary bloodshed while simultaneously eviscerating the idea of a “war on drugs.” I like to think of this interview as a companion piece to my first interview with Winslow, when we talked about his novel Savages long before it was universally praised by critics and turned into an underrated film adaptation by director Oliver Stone.

There are plenty of other features over at Kirkus as well. Among this summer’s entries you’ll find:

  • I had a fascinating conversation with Dr. Paul Offit, one of the world’s leading researchers on infectious diseases. I think Dr. Offit has a fascinating point of view and I think more people should listen to him, although he’s often demonized in the press and by idiot celebrities. “Watch what parents go through when they watch their child slowly die over a period of a few days because they chose not to give their child an influenza vaccine,” he said. “You become a passionate advocate.” (This is the part where anybody that doesn’t believe in vaccines or physics or gravity or whatever should just move on down the road).
  • I called London and published this interview with the preeminent British artist Bryan Catling about his otherworldly novel The Voorh.
  • A chat with journalist Mark Ribowsky about the shock and awe of Otis Redding in Dreams to Remember. “It’s like Hank Williams,” Ribowsky said. “These people endure because they were just so authentic. Music today is so phony and so superficial. It’s a bunch of people get together in a studio and they don’t know what they want to make. When Otis Redding came into a studio, he knew exactly what he wanted the song to sound like because it was all in his head. He knew how to make music come alive.”
  • I had a great talk with music journalist Fred Goodman about his new biography of Allen Klein, the guy who talked his way into managing both The Beatles and the Stones. His relationship with the Stones was so famously brittle that it led Keith Richards to dryly comment that knowing Allen Klein was “the price of an education.”
  • Science, yeah! It was my pleasure to interview Dr. Carl Safina, one of the world’s leading experts on Marine Ecology. His new book, Beyond Words, is about his journeys into the wild to see animals for their own nature, not as beasts that exist in the context of being around human beings.  There are lots of good ideas in that interview but my takeaway from the interview came down to just four words from the good doctor: “Their flood is us.”
  • Imagine Richard Nixon as the sole defender of our universe against unimaginable Lovecraftian horrors. Go ahead. I’ll wait. Now imagine you get to talk to Tricky Dick all day long and get him to explain just what the hell he was up to all that time. That’s what Austin Grossman did with his wild new novel Crooked and I got to grill him about the experience.

ArmadaFinally, I kind of buried the lede, but I finally got around to interviewing Ernest Cline, which was a real pleasure. I first met Ernie during an event at the Boulder Bookstore to publicize Ready Player One back in 2012. He was really nice then, gave me a business card, and readily agreed to do an interview. (Yes, I know I’m a geek. My copy of Ready Player One is signed by both Ernie Cline and Wil Wheaton, who narrated the audiobook of RPO and his new one, Armada. Get over it.) Of course, this was before Steven Spielberg famously signed on to adapt RPO for Warner Bros. and Ernie subsequently did an interview with anyone with access to electricity, but it was a lot of fun nonetheless.

Most of Ernie’s commentary made it into the interview but it was fun to find out that he has more games and Easter eggs planned for Armada. The book has been out for a while now, so I think it’s fair for kids to find out that there is lots of cool stuff out there on the Interwebs related to the book. I’m not obsessive enough to go search for it all like Wade Watts, but it’s fun to run across things like:

So that’s all tons of fun. Upcoming I’ll also have an interview with Chuck Wendig, who famously tweeted that he wanted to write a Star Wars novel. One year to the day later, his novel Star Wars: Aftermath will be released on September 4th. That book is all hush-hush but I’ll have some good stuff about his new thriller Zeroes and his terrific little horror series that starts with Blackbirds.

delorean_back_to_the_future_wallpaper-other  In the meantime, I will see you all again in the future.